Best Spring Activities in Colorado Springs

In the Spring, the entire state begins to thaw, which opens up a wide variety of new activities. As things start to warm up and life begins to thrive in the new weather, more and more people travel to the area as spring is undoubtedly the best time to visit Colorado Springs

The spring brings out all of the best in the city as wildflowers start to pop up, the trails dry out, and everyone is enjoying the longer daylight hours. This is a time to get outside and see everything that the area has to offer, so we have brought together some of the best spring activities in Colorado Springs for everyone to enjoy this region as much as we do. 

Wildflower Hunting

Springtime means flowers, and when talking about Colorado Springs, it means many things. This is one of the best things to do in Colorado Springs throughout the year, and the season is upon us! The snow has disappeared and made room for all new life to pop up and dazzle us with its colorful displays. 

Many of the best hikes in Colorado Springs will be covered in wildflowers during this season. Hiking along Pike’s Peak will provide an overview of the area that will let you absorb all of the colors at once. Adding a wildflower identification book to the experience is a great way to learn more about the area and become more engaged during a hike. 

Garden of the Gods

Whenever anyone talks about hiking in the area, it’s guaranteed that Garden of the Gods will come up. This is what the region is best known for, and rightfully so. This Natural Monument is a stunning display of the local geology and is full of trails to guide your experience through the area. 

In the springtime, the red rock stands in front of mountains that are still holding on to the last remnants of winter, making the red pop out even more than it does in the summer. 

guided hike through the Garden of the Gods is one of the best ways to learn about the region’s incredible geological formation and natural features while getting to explore as much as possible. 

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Feeding giraffes isn’t necessarily one of the first things that come to mind when looking at activities in Colorado Springs, but the area offers this unique experience. The Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is tucked into the side of a mountain overlooking Colorado Springs. There’s an impressive array of different animals that inhabit the zoo, such as Amur leopards, Australian Parakeets, and giraffes. 

After visiting with all the wildlife, you can jump on the Mountaineer Sky Ride that will take you up high to show off the beautiful region in all of its color and glory of spring. 

Photo by Kevin Bree on Unsplash

Colorado Springs Food Tour

While a food tour is one of the best things to do year-round, we love it as an option for things to do in Colorado Springs in the springtime. The city is full of fantastic food and drink locations worth visiting. On a local food tour, you can get a little bit of everything before heading home and letting your belt loose. 

Sprng weather makes for the perfect experience outdoors. You can easily walk around downtown from restaurant to restaurant without sweating heavily or shivering your way down the road. It’s an excellent time to stroll around and digest the most recent meal!

Climb a Fourteener

A Colorado classic for the most adventurous of visitors is to go and climb a fourteener. The term ‘fourteener’ refers to a mountain with an elevation above 14,000 feet. Some of these are challenging hike that requires an early rise and challenging climbs, but Pikes Peak is the easiest, most family-friendly, and closest to Colorado Springs. 

You can hop in the car and be near the summit of Pikes Peak in a matter of hours, but you can also camp along the road at designated campgrounds to make a weekend trip out of the climb.

While the trail is much easier than others, it’s still necessary to make sure you are well-prepared for the hike. Afternoon storms can start in the spring, and you’ll want to make sure you are off the trail in time before the weather rolls in. 

Rock Climbing

Rock climbing is one of the favorite sports for all Colorado locals. If you’re new to the sport, a guided rock climbing tour is the perfect introduction to both the area and the sport. In the spring, the rock is dry, and the colder temperatures provide the ideal climbing climate. 

If you’re an established climber that climbs more than they eat, check out Garden of the Gods, Cheyenne Canyon, and Red Rock Canyon. They’re all in the vicinity and have some world-class climbing that is less frequented than other spots in Colorado. 

Glen Eyrie Castle

Finally, the springtime has everyone feeling on top of the world, so you may as well feel like a king or queen in the Glen Eyrie Castle. The original founding father of Colorado Springs, General William Jackson Palmer, built this massive castle for his wife, but it is now open for tours. 

This Victorian Castle sits on over 700 acres of pristine Colorado land. Several different events are created to provide various unique experiences to the guests. There’s something for everyone at the castle, from tea tours to writing workshops. 

Tips for Getting Outside Daily (even in cold weather)

It’s a proven fact that getting outside on the regular has immense benefits for mental and physical health alike. Even knowing all of these facts, it can still be one of the most difficult events to break the barrier of the doorway and step outside. On top of the day-to-day difficulty, the cold weather adds an entirely new obstacle to overcome.

We can be tough on ourselves and often think that it only counts if we go outside and hike a five-mile trail, bike for at least an hour, or do an overnight trip with friends. The biggest mistake we make here is not being kind enough to ourselves in the midst of everything going on every day. Here are some tips for getting outside daily to help everyone work on boosting their mental and physical health, even if it’s only for a short period of time. 

The Benefits of Getting Outside

Studies upon studies have looked into how the outdoors is beneficial for the mental wellbeing of humans. Programs like the Children and Nature Network work to bring these benefits into public knowledge, but here is a shortlist of the benefits these programs are trying to make common knowledge. 

  • Improved relational skills
  • Reduced stress, anger, and aggression
  • Increase in Vitamin D
  • Promotes resilience
  • Increased self-esteem
  • Decreased depression

If you’re in the same boat as a lot of us, seasonal affective disorder is a real issue that needs managing when the winter hits. SAD, rightfully named, results in increased levels of depression as the days get shorter and the cold keeps us bundled up inside. 

All of the mental health benefits of the outdoors work towards relieving the symptoms of SAD and can even target the root causes by exposing your brain to the natural elements and helping it produce the chemicals needed to keep yourself strong through the winter. 

In addition to the interactions of nature and mental health, we see these tips for getting outside daily as a way to connect yourself to the world around you and engage in more environmentally responsible behaviors. In the long run, getting outside helps preserve our world to continue enjoying it. 

8 Ways to Get Outside Daily

Enjoying nature all winter can be made easy when you find the activities you love to do. Here are eight ways that can easily help you find your way outside every day. Remember that only 20 minutes of outdoor time a day can start to bring about all of these benefits that we’ve been discussing. A combination of these activities, or a single one, can easily reach your goal of 20 minutes. 

Walk your dog

Whether you have a dog or not, a walk outside is an easy way to take time to yourself and decompress or prepare for the coming day. Starting your day with a walk can help to clear your mind and allow you to go into the day with a positive mindset that can shift your entire mood all day long. 

Grab some tea or coffee to go

Hot drinks in the cold weather are a savior to us all. Hot drinks can act as hand warmers and can heat us up while we drink. Using a hot coffee or tea as an excuse to get outside also allows you to stay warm if it’s a chillier day. Take a walk or find a bench, but be sure to drink that coffee outside. 

Plan lunch at the park

Meeting others for a lunch date is common as we often have the time to take a quick break from work. Plan to meet a friend at the park where you can each take turns bringing lunch every other week. It’s a great way to catch up with friends and utilize the outdoor spaces that most cities offer. 

https://unsplash.com/photos/yote8-zY2Ec

Ride to work

Riding a bike to work is one of the best ways to help you reach your physical fitness goals and boost your mental health. The Netherlands is considered to be the cycling nation of the world. Over 27% of all trips are made by bike. The obesity rate is one of the lowest in the world. Some studies show that swapping out only 12% of short car trips with a bike ride can increase lifespan by 14 months. 

Take your break outside

Throughout the day, everyone needs to be taking mental breaks. Everyone knows what it feels like to be burnt out at the end of a long work day. These short breaks are the perfect opportunity to step outside and get some fresh air. Even if you stand there, the fresh air also has impressive health benefits. 

Find local hikes

If you’re looking for more adventurous ways to get outside, local hikes should be on the menu. Getting outside in cold weather can be made easy when you know what to expect and how to prepare. This time outside can be a quick in and out trail, but you can also extend the trip to last for miles. 

Do normal tasks outdoors

Try bringing your normal everyday tasks into the outdoors. Put a nice bench on the porch or in the yard or find a cafe with outdoor seating and start reading the newspaper there. Any work done without the quiet of an office space can also be moved outside. 

Plant a garden

Gardens are incredible for helping people get outside because it gives them a reason and purpose to go out. Tending to a garden takes immense love and devotion, meaning time. If you start a garden, it can be a reason to get out and spend long chunks of time in your yard working for something that you can enjoy later on. 

Hiking with your Dog in the Winter

Leaving your dog at home isn’t a real option for most of us. You may tell others that your dog doesn’t do well away from you, but the truth is always that you don’t do well away from the pup. Regardless of the reasoning, hiking with your dog in the winter is an enjoyable experience for everyone involved. 

Winter hiking can be strenuous for seasoned hikers all around the world. Some are more accustomed to it, while others are better adjusted for tropical climates. The fact holds true when we start talking about your furry best friend as well. Certain dogs love the snow, while some won’t even leave the house and brave the cold. 

This quick guide serves to help first-time snow pups become lovers of the cold rather than learn to fear it. Soon enough, your dog will be crying to get outside when the flakes start falling. 

Paw protection

Before all else, your dog is going to feel the cold in its paws. Even with years of rough roads to toughen up their pads, the snow can be detrimental to a dog’s winter hiking experience. 

Many dogs that aren’t accustomed to winter will get snow trapped in between their toes, causing them to stop and try to remove it quite often. It’s a difficult thing to work with and is much better to prevent before having to pick snow out of their paws every ten minutes. 

One of the best ways to protect paws is to try on booties. A lot of different companies make booties, but they all fit differently. Remember that your dog’s front and back paws might be different sizes, so some booties only come in pairs.

There are other options for the dogs who rip the booties off immediately or have the kind of paws that booties fall straight off. In the North, the most popular solution amongst sled dogs is a salve called Musher’s Secret. Although it isn’t much of a secret anymore, it’s the perfect layer that protects snow from building up and damaging paws. 

Bundle them up

Malamutes and Huskies are well-equipped with a thick fur coats to keep them toasty all winter long. Even your Golden Retriever or Australian Shepherd might have enough hair to get them through more mild winters. If you’ve fallen for a short-haired pup, it might not be long before you see them shivering and trying to cozy up next to you. 

Many dogs love to be swaddled in a warm winter jacket that adds another layer of protection from the elements and helps trap the heat they produce while running around. In winter, hiking with your dog isn’t about making a big fashion statement, but it may require adding to your dog’s wardrobe.

Higher caloric intake

When people start asking, “is it safe to hike in winter?” they inevitably find an article that talks about eating. Food is the body’s main fuel source to produce heat, and the same goes for your dog. 

So, before you head out onto the trail, give your pup a few extra handfuls or scoops of their kibble. It can make a huge difference in helping to keep them warm and energized for a longer hike.

Even when your dog is fit and ready to go on long summer hikes, the winter is much more demanding when it comes to energy spent. Bring along a lot of high-fat treats (think “salmon jerky”) that will give a boost of energy to help your pup warm up. 

Train them properly

Another added danger on the trail in the winter is skiers and snowboarders. In the summer, your dog may avoid mountain bikers on the trail, but many dogs see skiers as a person to play a game with. Train them to stay away from skiers and other people moving quickly through the snow. 

Skis use a sharp metal edge on both sides to help dig into the ice. In the wrong circumstances, that metal edge can easily hurt any person or dog, especially at high speeds. 

It’s best to keep your dog on a leash, even if they are used to having free range. The transition to winter hiking with your dog can be a big one, and they need to learn the new environment before being left to roam freely. 

Have a backup

Bringing a dog along can sometimes be like bringing a small child. When they decide that they don’t want to hike anymore, you won’t be hiking anymore. So, you need to come prepared with a backup plan. 

One day your pup can be ready to take on any level of snow, and the next, they will be shivering at the sight of it. If you have another hike planned that might be drier or slightly warmer, head in that direction. Recognize that you need to be flexible and make smart decisions for your dogs because they won’t always do the same. 

Modify your first aid kit

One of the biggest parts of hiking safety is having first aid training and the supplies you’ll need. First off, a first aid kit is a must for any hiking, regardless of the season. When you add your dog into the mix, you “need to modify it to become a human and dog first aid kit. In the winter, hiking with a dog means learning proper hiking safety and first aid. 

A lot of doggy first aid is the same as human first aid. You’ll want to add extra gauze pads, athletic tape, cotton balls, gloves, and the rest of the normal gear. More dog-centered first aid would mean packing some of the following:

  • Hydrogen peroxide – Useful for inducing vomiting if they found anything they shouldn’t have gotten into.
  • Towel – Wet dogs are dangerous in the winter. They can freeze quickly, and it’s best to get them as dry as possible, fast. 
  • Soft muzzle – Any mouth injuries may be inflamed by eating snow, which they will likely try and do. This can also help reduce the licking of other wounds. 
  • Rubber booties – To protect any wounds that happen on their feet, have some rubber booties to cover them up. 

We all prefer not to even think about our dog getting injured, but the truth is that it’s possible. It’s best to come prepared and ready to treat anything as the vet is a bit more out of reach when you are in the mountains. 

Visibility

Visibility means two separate things here. First off, a whiteout snowstorm and blinding sunlight bouncing off the snow can be dangerous for your dog’s eyes. Second, short days mean longer nights, and you want to find your dog if they ever get loose in the dark. 

If you’ve hiked in the snow, you know how bright the white landscape around you makes everything. It can be difficult to see, which is why mountaineers wear those silly goggles with peripheral protection. 

Fortunately, you can get a pair of goggles for your dog for both function and fashion that makes them look ready to hit the ski slopes. Goggles will help to protect them from the dangerous UV rays that can quickly damage their eyes as well as the cold snow pelting through the air. They’ll look cool and be able to keep their vision.

Long, dark nights and winter go hand in hand. Maybe you don’t live somewhere like Alaska, where there’s barely any sun to be seen in winter, but the chance is still higher that you will get stuck out in the dark. 

Any time you go out with the potential of finding yourself in the dark, it’s best to have something like a light-up collar for your dog. This way, if they get loose, you can track them through the woods by the bobbing neon green light. It will simply help to ease your mind and know where they’re at throughout the entire hike. 

Winter Sports to Try in the New Year

With a brand new year and a ground blanketed with snow, there’s no better time to get outside and try out some new winter sports. Staying inside and making your way through the Netflix queue is an easy way to try and make the dark winter days pass, but you quickly feel the physical and mental effects. 

Getting outside in the winter is one of the best ways to stay in shape, and more importantly, stay mentally healthy. Downhill skiing and extreme winter sports can seem intimidating for anyone who isn’t accustomed to playing around in the snow.

The good news is that there are plenty of other great winter sports for beginners and experts alike to try for the first time this year. 

Start Slow

Winter Hiking and Walking

There’s no need to jump straight into bombing down the mountainside on a pair of skis or a snowboard. Simply getting outside to find a winter hike to try out is a great way to introduce yourself to a new winter snowscape. Get out on winter hikes with your friends and family, or even go solo in a well-maintained area to start. It’s great for all skill levels. 

A big part of starting new winter sports in the new year is learning to love the cold. You’ll often find yourself heating up as you start moving. Still, it’s an immense help if you can appreciate the ice-covered trees, frozen streams, and fluffy powder covering the ground—hiking and walking help get you in the right mindset for other winter sports. 

This is a great starter activity because all you need to do is learn how to dress for winter hiking, head to your closet, and straight out the door. There’s no complicated gear system or any technical skills you’ll need. Just stay in safe terrain on well-traveled trails, and you can start to challenge yourself from there. 

If you need a little extra traction as you hike, invest in traction aids like micro-spikes or yak tracks to give you more confidence on snow and ice-covered trails.

Snowshoeing

If you want to get deeper into the mountains, you may find that you start sinking in the snow. Flotation devices are common in the winter, and one of the most popular ways of staying above the snow is on a set of snowshoes.

Snowshoeing is an enjoyable choice with plenty of options of places to go. There are many winter activities in Colorado Springs, but with snowshoeing, you can explore the same trails you would in the summer but see them in a completely different light. 

Cross Country Skiing

Even if you have never been on skis before, you may find that you would love trying out cross country skiing. It can be a slow-paced sport, but it doesn’t have to be. This is one of the best winter sports for beginners because it keeps you warm and can be learned quickly. 

Once you start to feel more comfortable on classic skis, you can try out skate skiing. This is a much more active style of cross country skiing that will get you moving quickly and get a better aerobic workout than running in the summer. 

Photo by Tim Foster on Unsplash

Picking up the pace

Downhill Skiing and Snowboarding

Downhill skiing, or snowboarding, is a great winter activity that doesn’t need to be incredibly fast-paced. You can start slow, and Colorado Springs is a great place to start from. There are plenty of local areas where you can find lessons with affordable rentals. 

Fat Biking

Fat biking has become widely popular as biking technology has moved forward over the last few years. These bikes are designed with huge, fat tires that help to keep you afloat on top of deeper powder. 

You can travel on typical mountain bike trails in the winter with a fat bike, but you can also set out and explore other areas that you may not be able to access on a mountain bike in the summer. Fat bikes are also available to rent out from several different gear shops, so you don’t even have to invest in buying one. 

Ice Skating

Whether it’s on a frozen rink in the city or on a high alpine mountain lake, ice skating is a classic winter sport to try out. If you’re a beginner, it will take a good level of humility to be okay with falling and still getting back up, but once you get the hang of it, it can be quite fun.

Just be careful on mountain lakes if you are a beginner. It can be challenging to recognize safe areas with thick enough ice. Only go if you have someone experienced that knows how to determine the safety of the ice. 

Dog Sledding

Dog sledding isn’t something that many people have access to where they live. Still, it can be an incredibly fun activity to try out if you find the right people to go with. Many professional dog sledders will offer lessons or rides at a price. If you love your furry friend as much as your human child, you’ll understand why this is such a popular winter sport. 

Skijoring

Speaking of your furry friends, skijoring is another fun winter sport to do with dogs, but it isn’t for beginners. Skijoring is a combination of dog sledding and cross country skiing. If you like skiing but hate doing all the work of moving yourself forward, your dog can help pull you forward. You do need a harness for you and your dog to get started, but if you already know how to cross country ski, and your dog loves snow, this can be a great new activity to try. 

Skijoring requires an active and enthusiastic dog who loves running and working hard in the snow. If your chihuahua hates to go out in the cold to use the bathroom, you may want to stick to classic cross country skiing this winter. 

Photo by Jérémy Stenuit on Unsplash

Full Speed Ahead

If you’re looking at this list and feel that you need more, check out the sports listed below. We would categorize these as being closer to the “extreme” (and maybe just bizarre) end of things.

  • Kite skiing
  • Ice yachting
  • Snow kayaking
  • Ice diving
  • Snow machining
  • Ice ballet

There’s something for everyone out there, as humans have become highly creative with what they can do when our world becomes blanketed in snow. 

5 Tips for Staying Warm on Any Winter Adventure

Hiking in winter can quickly turn south if you don’t head out prepared. Sometimes you feel warm and happy until you’re miles from your car and the deep, bone-crushing chill starts to settle down.

A successful winter camping trip, or any winter outdoor activities, rely upon staying warm. 

No matter the conditions, it’s possible to keep warm for a long time. You only need to know-how. Here are five time-proven tips for staying warm on any winter adventure. Happy snow days!

Get your body moving

One of the greatest fallacies of all time is that you can stay warm if you throw on the largest puffy jacket there is and sit still. The truth of the matter is that clothes don’t produce any level of heat. All they do is trap the heat your body produces.

The more you move, the more heat your body makes. 

During winter outdoor activities, your body becomes a furnace. You’re making the heat that will help to keep you warm. Plan a trip that will have your body constantly moving. You want to use all the energy you’ve stored over the holiday season and put it into productive, heat-blasting movement. 

The catch is, you must be careful with how intensely you move. Moving uphill quickly, or putting high cardio levels into your day, can soon lead to sweat. In the winter, sweat is no longer your friend; it is exactly the opposite. Getting wet will increase the speed at which your body enters hypothermia. So, keep your movement consistent, but pace yourself and stop before you start to break a sweat. 

“Be bold, start cold”

The way you dress is also incredibly important for winter hiking. It will always be tempting to start hiking in a puffy jacket and thick fleece pants.

Why not, right?

It’s cold out, so you may as well be warm. Unfortunately, this is one of the quickest paths towards making yourself drastically cold. 

Experienced hikers and winter campers like to say, “be bold, start cold.” What they mean is, if you start hiking with fewer layers, while a bit cold, you’ll quickly warm up and thank yourself for dealing with the cold for a short period. 

Starting cold will help you to manage the sweat situation. When you stop, remember that all of the heat will be quickly sucked from your body to the cold air around you. Have a jacket handy that can be tossed on as soon as you stop moving to help trap the heat. Before you get going again, throw that jacket back in your bag, and then can you start hiking again.

Eat… a lot

Every furnace needs a fuel source. The more you feed the furnace, the more heat it can produce. What we’re saying is, here is the perfect excuse to load up on as many calories as humanly possible while hiking. 

Foods with high fat and calorie counts are optimal for winter camping. Butter becomes your best friend. Extreme mountaineering trips rely on a hearty stash of butter worth every ounce that it adds to a pack. If you aren’t into eating butter without pause, try eating a spoonful of peanut butter before sleeping and reap the warmth and benefits. 

Do your best to take a break from any eating restrictions you may have while at home. Hiking in general demands that you eat far more than normal. Hiking in winter means doubling the daily calories, not worrying about sticking to your New Year’s resolution. This is where brownies become an acceptable and encouraged breakfast food.

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

The outdoors can quickly make you tired of hearing people tell you to drink water over and over. It seems to be the only solution to every problem you encounter. People are telling you to drink water to avoid overheating, drink water if you’re sick, drink water every time you breathe, and so on. That being said, if you want to stay warm, drink water.

The trickiest part of drinking water in the winter is wanting to. It seems counterintuitive to drink cold water while it’s cold outside and you want to stay warm. There are a couple of reasons why dehydration can be even more dangerous in the winter than normal temperatures. 

First, your blood relies on hydration to help move heat from your core out to your extremities. With less water in your system, it struggles to move heat around the body, resulting in cold fingers and toes that you may not even feel anymore. 

Not only do you need it to stay warm, but it’s also essential to drink water because you may not even realize that you’re getting dehydrated. Most people associate dehydration with sweating profusely. Contrary to popular belief, we lose most of the water in our bodies through breathing. In the winter, the steam that leaves your mouth is precious water quickly leaving the body.

One of the most helpful tricks to staying hydrated and warm is to bring a Thermos. It’s heavier, but it can often be a game-changer. Warm drinks like tea or hot chocolate will work to hydrate you and provide a separate heat source. It’s one of the few things that makes it easy to forget about weight. 

Bring extras

Extra socks, hats, and gloves should be in every winter camper’s backpack. These are some of the easiest pieces of gear to misplace or get wet. The moment your beanie is gone is the moment you start to lose a considerable percentage of heat. 

Having extras will allow you to keep warm and, more importantly, stay dry. If you get extremely cold feet, try changing socks halfway through the hike to get rid of all the sweat and cold that comes along with it. 

How to Dress For a Winter Hike

When the sun is shining, the birds are chirping, and the breeze cools your skin, it’s easy to get outside. Hiking in the winter can be a completely different game. The cold, snow, and often the wind can all come together and make it difficult to motivate yourself to shut Netflix down and head out on the trail. If you are a beginner, be sure to check out guided winter hikes and get a feel for what it’s like before heading out alone!

Your biggest key to success in those cold dark months is learning to wear hiking in the winter. A wardrobe that keeps you warm and dry can be a complete game-changer. It turns a cold and miserable day into a pleasant tromp through the wilderness with breathtaking, snow-capped vistas every way you look. Winter hiking is personally one of my favorite things to do, incredibly as the trails clear of their typical summer crowds and the world seems a bit quieter altogether. 

Dressed in the proper attire, you will end up barely noticing the cold, and soon it can be just you out there trekking through the snow back to your cabin with a warm mug of hot chocolate waiting. 

Photo by Elijah Hail on Unsplash

Layer up

Layering for winter hiking is an absolute must if you want to do it right. Layering allows for temperature regulation that you don’t get from wearing your heaviest coat with a t-shirt underneath. The goal is to add and remove layers as you like. When you stop, it can be easy to want to sit and cool down, but immediately throwing a layer will help trap all the heat your body is producing. 

It helps to think about your body as a furnace. The more you move, the more heat it will produce. When you take layers off, it’s like opening up all the windows. When you’re moving, it’s okay because the furnace is still pumping at its top-notch. Once you stop, the furnace stops, and the heat starts to disappear through those open windows. If you shut them too late (adding a layer after cooling down), your furnace is still shut off until you start hiking again, and it will be tough to warm back up. 

In all honesty, dressing for winter hiking isn’t that different from prepping for some other seasons. It can be similar to what to wear hiking in the Fall, just with a few more mid-layers and remembering to take extra precautions all around.

Get the right shoes on

When the winter comes around, tire shops rejoice because everyone is prepping and putting brand new winter tires on their car. Hiking in the winter should be no different than driving. You need the right shoes for the job. Snow and ice interact with the bottom of your feet much differently than dry dirt or mud. I strongly recommend against going out on a trail with your summer sneakers or even summer hiking boots. They simply don’t have the proper insulation or traction.

One way to add traction is through additional traction devices designed to dig into the snow and ice rather than interact with the surface. YakTrax and other versions of microspikes act like a lighter version of crampons used for mountain climbing. There are great traction devices for hiking, trail running, or running in the city. 

Not only is traction a completely different game, but your feet are also prone to getting much colder, much faster, in the winter. The ground is essentially a heat vacuum, sucking all of the warmth through the soles of your shoes away from your feet. Winter boots have a thick insulating layer in the sole that helps to reduce this heat loss. They also are better insulated all around, ensuring that the heat your feet make stays in the boot. 

Protect your extremities 

Boots are one way to help your feet stay happy and healthy during winter hiking. Feet, toes, and fingers are often at the highest risk of developing frostbite due to the poor levels of circulation and presence of fat in them. That means we have to take extra steps to protect all of our extremities. 

To protect your feet, wear wool socks, or at the very least, wear synthetic socks. Thick wool socks help provide a huge amount of insulation, even if your feet get a little bit wet. Make sure that the thick socks don’t make your boots too tight, as that can quickly lead to a cutoff in circulation and a faster route to frostbite.

Pack at least two extra pairs of socks, and change them halfway through the hike to make sure your feet are dry. In the winter, dry means warm.

Fleece or wool mittens with an outer waterproof layer are the best moves for the hands. I also bring an extra pair of mittens if the interior layer gets wet while I’m out there. 

Included on the list of extremities will be your ears and nose. These spots are also highly susceptible to frostbite or at least frostnip. They can be easily forgotten when dressing, but you’ll feel them get cold quickly on the trail. You can wear a neck gaiter with a fleece layer that covers your nose and cheeks with a hat or headband to take care of your ears. An easy cover-all is a balaclava, but I like to wear these in the extreme cold and add a layer for more ears over that. 

Everything else we’ve all forgotten

Other items to check off your list before hiking would be:

Sunglasses and sunscreen: The sun can be brutal in winter, especially when the snow reflects it. 

Gaiters help keep snow out of your boots and, therefore, keep your feet dry. 

Batteries die much faster in the winter as the cold will drain them. Bring spares and keep the ones you have close to your body. 

Headlamp: Daylight is sparse in the winter, and it will sneak up on you if you aren’t ready for it. Always have a headlamp, so you don’t get stuck in the dark. 

Prepping for Ski Season in Colorado Springs

The days are getting shorter, and the cold is settling in. It’s time for a lot of people to head inside, get cozy, and wait for the spring thaw to come around. While they’re all inside, many others have a single thing on their mind: skiing.

Skiing in Colorado Springs is one of the greatest parts of living in the great state of Colorado. The number of bluebird days is unbeaten by anywhere else in the US, and the snow seems to keep coming. 

So instead of preparing to hibernate, most of us know that it’s time to prepare for ski season. With a ski season that can easily run from mid-October to May, it can seem like you were just on the slopes yesterday. It’s important to remember that there’s still a lot to get done before you can comfortably and safely get back out this year.

Get your lift ticket, and get it early

The first step in getting ready for ski season is ensuring that you’ll have a spot on the lifts. Season passes can get picked up quickly, especially in the early months when prices are low. The best move is to decide when exactly you will be skiing.

Will it be weekends only?

How about the weekdays?

Are you just getting out for Christmas vacation?

The amount of time, especially what days of the week that time falls on, will greatly influence the pass that will work best for a skier or snowboarder.

Weekday season passes will be significantly cheaper than passes that can get you on all week long.

Day passes tend only to be good if you’re only going to a resort a few times in a year.

Season passes quickly pay for themselves if you use them regularly. 

The most popular passes in Colorado these days are the Epic and Ikon passes. They have a few significant differences but are both well-known for getting you powder days at resorts across the West. The best option depends on the mountain that will be your go-to.

The prices of season passes can be a huge turnoff that can feel discouraging. When the season hits, though, if you don’t have a season pass, you will second guess spending money every time you want to go ski. Having that season pass allows for freedom and guilt-free (or at least low-guilt) skiing throughout the entire season. 

Get your gear in proper, working order

The second major step necessary to get ready for ski season is to make sure all of your gear is as ready for the snow as you are. Skis left sitting in a garage for months on end after an entire season will need some tender loving care before getting back on the slopes. It’s often easy to get your skis tuned up by a professional. It isn’t too expensive and will make a world of difference. 

If you’re looking to do the job yourself, it’s a difficult skill to pick up but easy to do once you know the basics. A general tune-up will have your skis back with sharpened edges, smoothed-out bottoms, and a full wax job. 

Next up is to make sure your boots still fit and seem to be in good condition. If they’ve been stored away deep in a crawlspace, mice may have used them as temporary housing over the summer, and new liners will be a necessity. Freak growth spurts can also happen, or sometimes the boots need to be remolded to fit your feet. Try them on and make sure no surprises come up when opening day rolls around. 

What about renting gear?

When skiing is just a now-and-again hobby, it can be a bit ridiculous to carry skis around everywhere you go and keep paying to tune them before the ski season. If you aren’t skiing continuously throughout the year, renting gear can have huge advantages over having your setup. 

Renting gear means not having to worry about what happens when you hit a rock, bust a binding, or start to feel the wear and tear happening. You return skis to where you rented them from, and they’re the ones who have to fix them. It’s the best and kindest practice to treat rental gear with love and care, but accidents happen. 

When you own gear, the investment can be worth it to get skis and boots that are more personalized to your skiing style. Certain skis fit the different types of skiing that some people do, but most beginners won’t be able to tell the difference. Owning your gear is like buying a house. Everything that the landlord used to take care of, a leaky faucet or busted heater, is now your responsibility. Every scratch that makes its way onto your skis stays there until fixed by you.

Photo by Kellie Enge on Unsplash

Get your body moving and back in shape

One of the easiest things to get out of shape and need some lubrication in its joints is your body. Six months off can quickly get anyone out of shape if they aren’t constantly running or doing some summer exercise. 

Skiing is far more physically demanding than a lot of people imagine. Even when it’s only downhill, the amount of strength required in your entire body is impressive. The best way to avoid getting injured early on in the season is to go in prepared. 

Set a workout routine that can be followed for a reasonable amount of time before opening day. It will help your body remember what it’s like to move and groove again. There’s no shame in taking the summer off, but there’s no good reason to slack off when winter hits. 

It doesn’t even need to be an extreme workout. Adding some lunges, burpees, and crunches into your daily routine can be enough to remind the body of what you’re about to ask it to do. Fifteen minutes a day can save an entire ski season from being ruined by one silly mistake. 

Photo by Luka Senica on Unsplash

Prepping for Ski Season in Colorado Springs

Getting ready for ski season can often bring up a lot of questions. This is especially true if it’s the first year you have chosen this wonderful city as your base, or if you’ve never skied before. From lessons to opening days, finding all of the answers can be a difficult task.

Here is a quick FAQ to help get everything straight and help to make sure that ski season comes smoothly this year. 

Where to ski in Colorado Springs

While there isn’t much resort skiing right outside Colorado Springs, there is plenty of incredible skiing within a quick drive. Monarch Mountain, Cooper, Copper, Breckenridge, Keystone, and more are reachable in less than three hours. It makes Colorado Springs a great hub for getting to loads of different resorts easily. 

When do the resorts in Colorado Springs open?

Resorts across Colorado have varying start dates, mainly due to their location and snow accumulation. Some of them open as early as mid-October, but some won’t be open until December. For current, up-to-date projections for opening, check out each resort’s website. You can find a general projected opening date here, but it may not be the most accurate. 

Where can you get your skis tuned up?

There are many different places to get your skis tuned within the city limits of Colorado Springs. It makes sense, as so many people choose to live here to have world-class skiing easily accessible. The Ski Shop, Christy Sports, and Colorado Kite and Ski are all popular places to get your skis fixed up in town. There are plenty of other shops that will leave you ready for the season; check out Google or ask around town. 

Can you rent or buy skis in town?

Like we’ve already mentioned, people live to ski in Colorado Springs. It’s a town that’s made to have skiing accessible, and that means being able to buy just about any skis you can imagine or renting a full downhill or touring set up the day you need it. 

Where can you get lessons?

Typically, the best move is to get lessons at the resort you are planning on skiing at. They have lessons for all experience levels and ages and run for different lengths of time. Be sure to arrange lessons ahead of time because the classes can fill up quickly, especially on busy holiday weekends. 

Our Favorite Hikes Near Colorado Springs

The landscape of Colorado is calling for everyone to come hiking. The stunning mountains, waterfalls, and red rocks make for a unique experience, no matter your skill level. Undoubtedly, one of the best ways to start your exploration of Colorado is by checking out the hikes near Colorado Springs. 

Nestled in the foothills of the mountains, Colorado Springs gives quick and easy access to some of the most diverse trails in the state. Remember that some hikes in the area may require a permit. For ease of use, we selected trails that match those in beauty, but there are no permits required for hikes.

Best hikes near Colorado Springs

Muscoco

Location: Mount Cutler/Mt. Muscoco Trailhead

Elevation Gain: 1,292 feet

Round Trip Mileage: 4.0 miles

Difficulty: Moderate

Views of the mountains sweep out to your right, and Colorado Springs lays the backdrop to your left as you head up to the summit of Mount Muscoco. This moderate trail is located just southwest of Colorado Springs in the North Cheyenne Cañon Park. It’s a quick drive out to a hike that is well worth the final climb. 

The Mount Muscoco trail is well-known for the wildflowers that it boasts in the springtime, making it a great trail to do as the snow starts to melt. 

The Mount Cutler trail takes you to the trail that you are truly looking for. About a mile down the Mount Cutler trail is the Mount Muscoco trail. This trail will take you straight to the summit, but beware, the final climb is where all of the difficulty lies in this trail. 

For this hike, in particular, quality hiking boots are highly recommended. The final climb is rocky, and sneakers aren’t suitable to give your feet the support they will need. 

The Crags Trail

Location: Near Divide, CO

Elevation Gain: 820 feet

Round Trip Mileage: 4.8 miles

Difficulty: Easy to Moderate

We suggest checking out the Crags Trail for a great introduction to the area. Not only does it display some of the best landscapes of the area, but it also won’t push you too hard and make you not want to hike again. The trail is long enough to make it a workout and is relatively flat, with a total elevation gain of about 820 feet. 

The Crags Trail gives you a view of some of the most unique geological features in all of Colorado. Granite slabs erupt from the ground in large numbers, forming massive cliff sides and sheer-faced walls. The trail also takes you through some huge aspen forests that allow you to see another part of Colorado’s brilliant landscape. Head out on this trail in the fall and be prepared to have your world blanketed in gold by these magnificent trees. 

Another reason why this trail is perfect for beginners is the ease of use. It’s well-marked, as trail number 664, and well-maintained. The forest service has recently constructed new parking, so you don’t need to rush there at 6 in the morning to get a spot. 

If you’re a beginner wanting to start exploring these areas, ensure that you are prepared. Read up on Colorado hiking safety and know before you go. 

Garden of the Gods – The Palmer, Buckskin-Charley, Niobrara, and Bretag Trail Loop

Location: Garden of the Gods Park

Elevation Gain: 449 feet

Round Trip Mileage: 4.0 miles

Difficulty: Easy

When avid hikers think about Colorado Springs, one of the first places that come to mind is Garden of the Gods. This National Natural Landmark is well-known for the sandstone towers that color the sky with their vibrant reds. Come here once, and you’ll be itching to come back and try the climbing, horseback riding, or mountain biking that the park has to offer. 

This trail, in particular, is a phenomenal introduction to the park. It combines four popular trails to make an easy four-mile loop, providing a taste of everything in the park. The route starts on the Palmer Trail and takes twists and turns through the most well-known towers in the park. 

Columbine Trail

Location: North Cheyenne Cañon Park

Elevation Gain: 1,607 feet

Round Trip Mileage: 7.6 miles

Difficulty: Moderate to Difficult

Now, here’s another trail to add to your list of Fall hiking in Colorado Springs. North Cheyenne Cañon is surrounded by mountains (some of which have also made this list) and provides an array of different views and landscapes to please everyone that tags along. 

The Columbine Trail has three different options for where to start. One of the best places to start, in our opinion, is the Starsmore Discovery Center. This center has a wealth of knowledge about the local flora and fauna, making it a great start or end to your hike. 

No matter what you are looking for, you can find it on the Columbine Trail. There are babbling brooks, warbling birds, and huge mountain vistas. While the trail is on the longer side, the elevation gains are evenly spread out, so you will barely notice it. 

Buckhorn

Location: North Cheyenne Cañon Park

Elevation Gain: 859 feet

Round Trip Mileage: 3.9 miles

Difficulty: Moderate

Another hike in North Cheyenne Cañon Park makes the list, showing off what this one place truly has to offer. If you’re trying to figure out where to hike in Colorado Springs, this park is a great place to start. 

Mount Buckhorn Peak is a quick hike up to a beautiful 8,380-foot summit that gives you a full 360-degree view of the world around you. The hike itself takes you through a forested setting that is a must-see in the fall. Once you are at the top, you can turn this trail into a quick out-and-back or continue down Buckhorn trail and return to where you started. 

The summit itself is somewhere you could spend an entire day. Once you are up there, you can scramble around on the huge number of boulders trying to find the highest one. This is an excellent hike if you want to take time to explore. 

How to Layer for Fall Hiking in Colorado

If you are a big hiker or nature enthusiast, you know that fall is arguably the best season for hiking. The energizing nip of crisp air on your face, the colorful foliage as nature buckles down for winter – personally, it’s my favorite time of year. If you are hoping to enjoy fall hiking here in Colorado, you certainly need to know how to layer for hiking. These tips on proper layering techniques will help ensure you are prepared for the weather you might encounter on a fall hike in the beautiful Rocky Mountains.

The Principles of Layering for Colorado’s Fall Weather

The first thing to know is that the term ‘layering’ doesn’t mean just wearing more and more clothes. In order to brave the elements and stay comfortable and safe, you need to wear the proper clothes in the proper order. First, the base layer serves to keep you dry when you sweat. Next, the middle layer is insulating to help retain body heat in Colorado’s colder weather. Finally, the outer layer protects against the harsher conditions you may experience on a fall hike.

We’ll start at the base layer and work our way out, so you understand what fabrics are best for each layer. We’ll also learn how to layer for the specifics of fall weather in Colorado and the hikes you are planning. As you likely know, fall in Colorado can range from warm to very cold. The weather can change quickly, and conditions can worsen with no warning. Especially if you are hiking to a higher elevation, say summiting one of the state’s many fourteeners, you will find temperatures and precipitation requiring a much different outfit than what you had on in the parking lot. It’s important to dress and pack well, as you will learn.

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

The Wicking Base Layer 

You can think of the base layer as the clothing that touches your skin. This is more than just a t-shirt and shorts or a long-sleeved shirt and long underwear. Remember that the base layer also includes underwear (boxers, briefs, bras, and more) and socks.

The main goal of the base layer is to wick away moisture and keep your skin dry. As you know, sweat cools you down, stealing your body heat much faster than a cold breeze. In the hot summer, you may not mind a cotton shirt absorbing and holding your sweat. In the fall and winter, though, cotton is at the top of the “Absolutely Not” list. Seriously, it’s one of the most important hiking safety tips of all time.

Photo by Stephen Leonardi on Unsplash

The Best Base Layer Materials

The best synthetic fabrics for base layers are polyester and nylon. You likely have these in your closet as your running or exercise clothes. You can go by personal preference, as long as it is ‘moisture-wicking,’ ‘dry-fit,’ or the like. Again, make sure your bras and boxers meet these criteria, too. A great natural fabric, especially for socks, is wool, as it wicks moisture and provides great heat retention. Wool is good for clothing, too, if you are in colder temperatures or hiking Colorado’s many mountains. It will keep you warm without being too heavy, but it also is more expensive than synthetic fabrics.

There are a few different options in terms of the weights of base layers, and you can decide based on the time of year and anticipated weather. No matter what you choose, your base layer should always be moisture-wicking. This layer should also fit snugly against your skin. You don’t want gaps between your skin and the material as it won’t be able to wick sweat away as effectively. A tight but comfortable base layer will keep your skin dry, which in turn will keep you warm and prevent skin irritation, like chafing and blisters.

Base Layering Tips for Colorado’s Fall Weather

Base layers are organized by weight; lightweight or ultra-lightweight for hotter weather and midweight or heavyweight for the colder months. This might mean shorts and a t-shirt in early fall when Colorado temperatures are in the 50s or 60s, and long johns and long-sleeved shirts in late fall when it’ll be in the 30s and 40s on average. Because the weather can change quickly here, especially in the mountains, I prefer to keep my base layer light and carry a heavier middle layer in my day pack.

Remember, the goal of this layer is moisture-wicking, where warmth is the job of the middle layer. That’s why lighter base layers make sense in Colorado’s fall conditions. You can always add more clothes later if the temperature drops up the mountain. The one exception to this is socks. My feet always run cold, so I highly recommend a thick wool sock for fall hikes, ones that cover your ankles! As long as your hiking boots are breathable, your feet will be happily dry and warm.

The Insulating Middle Layer

Next up, it is the job of the middle layer to retain body heat and keep you warm in colder temperatures. Where base layers tend to be stretchy and thin, you’ll recognize your middle layer pieces by their soft and puffy qualities. When shopping, you may see middle layer options listed as ‘soft shells.’ Depending on the weather, you can choose a lighter or heavier option, so it’s a good idea to have multiple middle layer pieces if you are planning on frequent fall hikes in Colorado. 

Photo by lucas Favre on Unsplash

Middle Layer Options for Fall in Colorado

For lighter wear, you might go with a microfleece pullover or hoodie. Fleece is nice because it dries quickly and stays warm. It is also breathable so that you won’t overheat. This is a great option for the early fall in Colorado. However, if it’s windy, you will definitely need an outer shell, or you’ll find the breathability a weakness.

For the colder days, a down jacket is the best middle layer. I am partial to synthetic down, both for the animals and the water resistance. Down insulated jackets don’t hold up well when wet, but they compress better than synthetic down if you need to save space in your pack. If a softshell is all you plan on wearing, I’d recommend one with a hood, so your neck stays warm. In this case, though, you will definitely need to pack a waterproof outer shell, as the fall in Colorado sees rain or snow regularly.

The Defending Outer Layer

Once you’ve got the dry and warm inner layers set, the last part of knowing how to layer for hiking is protecting against the elements. Fall in Colorado can be all over the map in terms of weather conditions, and this outer shell is key for making sure the wind, rain, and snow don’t penetrate and leave you cold and miserable.

Photo by Daniel Lincoln on Unsplash

The Best Outer Layers for Colorado’s Fall Season

For both jackets and pants, you will want waterproof outerwear. Trust me when I say that “water-resistant” is not good enough! If you get caught in a downpour, a water-resistant layer is going to soak and leave you shivering. Also, be sure it has a hood. Rain dripping down your neck and back is truly an uncomfortable and dangerous way to spend a hike.

In addition to water- and wind-proof material, your outer layer should also be breathable. These pieces are more expensive, but if you plan on exploring Colorado’s fall hikes, this feature is a must. Breathable jackets, ones with zippers in the armpits and such, are key for longer hikes because they keep you dry while you work hard. If the inner layers are wicking away moisture, but your outer layer isn’t breathable, the moisture will condense against it and soak your middle layer. You need breathability to allow fresh air to move through and clear out the humidity. 

One final feature of a good outer layer is durability. Since this layer has to brave the elements, you want something that will stand up to a bit of a beating, especially for pants that you’ll sit on, trek through the brush, and more. If your outer layer gets torn, you’ll have leaks when it rains. And with the expensive nature of these clothes, you want to make sure to buy something that is a good investment.

Packing for a Fall Hike in the Rockies

Now that you know the options for layering clothes, let’s talk about how to pack for day hiking in Colorado. Seasoned hikers are always carrying day packs, and it’s not just for the granola bars. 

When you start at the trailhead, you might be in your base layer and outer shell. Mid-fall in Colorado is comfortable, and you might reason that it’ll only be a few hours. But as you hike up the mountain, the weather changes. It will get colder and windier the higher you go, with less protection from surrounding trees. You may even get an unexpected shower or snow flurry. 

Before you leave, always check the weather to know what to expect. Then, pack that insulating middle layer anyway. A light fleece or down jacket won’t take up much room or add much weight, and you will be glad you have it when you need it. Wearing appropriate clothing and knowing how to layer for hiking will keep you comfortable and protected during your hike so you can enjoy mother nature, no matter what weather she brings.

What to Wear Hiking in Colorado

When you’re spending time planning a hiking vacation in Colorado, pouring yourself into the details, you’re envisioning everything goes right. You’re picturing smiles and laughter, time unplugged in nature, and memories made – whether by yourself or with your family. However, there’s a relatively easy way for things to go wrong. 

Being unprepared for Colorado’s weather patterns can not only put a wringer in your vacation – it can compromise your safety, too. We’ve put expert advice together to compile this informative overview of what to wear hiking in Colorado. You can also check out our other post on Hiking Safety in Colorado

Typical Weather

Before you can decide what to wear hiking, accommodate yourself with Colorado’s climate

  • Spring: Spring weather in the Colorado Springs area means pretty drastic temperature shifts from day to night. Highs can be anywhere in the 50s and lows in the 20s. 
  • Summer: Summer in the Colorado mountains is definitely warmer than spring. However, with highs in the mid-80s and lows in the low 50s, these significant shifts in temperature from day to night mean you’ll still need to pack more than just a t-shirt and sunblock. 
  • Fall: Highs in the 60s and lows in the 30s is just about perfect weather for hiking in Colorado, but it doesn’t mean you don’t need to bring plenty of layers – just in case you are hiking later in the day than you planned. 
  • Winter: Temperatures in Colorado Springs hang out in the 40s in the day and high teens at night during the winter.
Photo by Reymark Franke on Unsplash

Layering

Wearing and bringing extra layers with you is crucial when hiking in Colorado’s mountains. At the very least, your basic hiking outfit/packed extras should contain the following:

  • Moisture-wicking base layer.
  • Moisture-wicking undergarments.
  • Insulating layer. In summer, this may be a warm fleece, depending on the weather forecast. In winter, this needs to be a heavyweight insulated synthetic or down stuffed jacket, like a “puffy.”
  • Rain jacket
  • Wool or fleece hat
  • Extra socks. We prefer wool.
Photo by ArtHouse Studio from Pexels

The Problem with Cotton

There’s a phrase in the outdoor world that warns us, “Cotton kills.” While this sounds extreme and is not the case in every climate, it should definitely be kept in mind when hiking anywhere in Colorado. 

Cotton is hydrophilic, which means it loves water; the plant fibers attract moisture and hold onto it, so it dries out very slowly. It’s highly absorbent and can hold up to 27 times its weight in water. This means our bodies must work extra hard to heat ourselves along with the cotton fabric in an attempt to dry it out. This can be dangerous in climates such as Colorado’s that have major temperature shifts from day to night and storms that seem to come out of nowhere. 

Unsafe Cotton Scenarios

Imagine you’re hiking in any season – you’re working hard and exerting yourself physically, so naturally, you work up a sweat. Your hydrophilic cotton shirt is absorbing every drop of sweat your body generates as you’re hiking up and over mountains. 

Now, imagine you’re wearing that sweaty cotton shirt, and it’s getting late in the day, and the temperature is dropping fast. You’re going back down the mountain, and although the descent is brutal on your knees, your body temperature is dropping quickly because you aren’t using much energy hiking downhill. With strong winds that can decrease your body temperature in seconds, things can take a turn for the worse very quickly from here.

However, the good news is that this scenario is entirely avoidable with knowledge, good preparation, and mindful packing. When packing for your hiking trip in Colorado, it’s best to keep the phrase “cotton kills” in your mind.

What to Wear Hiking Instead of Cotton

Head to any outdoor gear store, and you’re bound to see the term “moisture-wicking” on dozens of tags. Moisture-wicking fabrics like synthetic and wool fabrics are the opposite of cotton: they are hydrophobic, meaning they resist water penetration. 

Polyester and nylon are top contenders among synthetic moisture-wicking fabrics, and wool is the leader (and my personal favorite) when it comes to natural fibers. Whether you get soaked in a downpour or sweat profusely on your hike, your moisture-wicking shirt, pants, and socks are going to dry super quickly and not leave you cold and clammy like cotton will. 

Additionally, wool is a superb natural insulator. This makes wool the leader in fabrics that transition from daytime to nighttime hiking in areas where temperatures shift dramatically, like Colorado. 

But isn’t wool too hot for summertime hiking?

You can purchase 100% wool hiking attire that is lightweight enough to wear while hiking in the summer in Colorado. Just look for base layers – they can be pricey but incredibly versatile and suitable for all of Colorado’s seasons.

Things to Remember

When considering what to wear while hiking in Colorado, it’s important to think past just your clothing. 

  • If you have sensitive skin, make sure you bring sunscreen to apply on all exposed skin, following the bottle’s directions. 
  • Sunglasses and hats can protect your eyes, neck, and face from the sun.
  • Bug spray will help keep the gnats at bay.
  • Colorado is home to over 27 types of ticks and 20 tick-borne diseases, including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. To prevent ticks from crawling onto your skin, opt out of the shorts, and wear long pants tucked into your socks. Even if it’s hot, your moisture-wicking pants will keep you cool enough to hike. Also, remember to learn more about Colorado tick bite prevention, dangers, and bite protocols.
  • Footwear should be closed-toed and provide adequate ankle support for optimal safety. 

Conclusion

Safety is the most important thing to consider when planning what to wear hiking in Colorado. If you’re unclear on how to hike safely, consider coming on one of our Guided Hiking Tours in Colorado Springs. We’ll make sure you’ve dressed appropriately, show you around Pikes Peak and Garden of the Gods, and keep you safe!