How To Get In To Rock Climbing

As a fun and challenging all-body workout, it is no surprise that rock climbing is such a popular sport. With indoor gyms popping up in cities all over the country, you might be wondering how to get into rock climbing.

We will explore the different types of rock climbing that you can try as a beginner, whether you plan to climb indoors or outdoors, as well as the gear you will need to get started. With some of the best beginner rock climbing routes right here in Colorado Springs, outdoor climbing is a fun way to explore nature, get access to some beautiful views, and learn a new athletic skill.

Also, don’t forget that a Guided Rock Climbing Trip with Broadmoor can also be an excellent introduction to this exciting sport.

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Types of Rock Climbing

Top-Rope Climbing

There are two types of climbing that are suitable for beginners, top-rope climbing and bouldering. In top-rope, as the name suggests, a rope hangs down from above, and as you climb, a belayer takes in the excess slack to keep the rope taut in case you fall. In an indoor gym, ropes hang from anchors like large pulleys. If you climb outdoors, a guide or qualified friend will create an anchor system using ropes and trees or rocks. 

Top-rope climbing routes range in difficulty from 5.0 to 5.15d, with 5.10s and above using a, b, c, and d to further distinguish difficulty. Where a 5.10a is easier than a 5.10d. Based on strength and athleticism, beginner climbers can generally climb up to a 5.4 or 5.6 on their first go. Climbers who are tall or strong might get away with these higher routes upfront, but as you move into intermediate climbs, technique and precision become more important than brute force.

Bouldering

Bouldering is a rope-free experience, with climbs typically up to fifteen feet maximum. If you are at a gym, the bouldering area will be padded to keep you safe when you jump down or fall. Learning how to fall correctly (stay loose and bend your knees!) will keep you safe from injuries. I generally downclimb to protect my knees, but it’s still important to know how to fall safely. If you are climbing outdoors, crash pads are essential for rock climbing safety.

The bouldering rating system is different from top-rope. Bouldering routes go from V0 to V17, with V2 being the hardest I’ve seen first-timers accomplish. Not only are these ratings different from top-rope, but they also don’t translate easily. Some people are much better at the big, power moves that many bouldering problems have. Others are more skilled with finesse and balance – challenges that are also more common to top-rope. Top-rope climbs at indoor gyms also range from 30 to 60 feet, making them a lot more of a cardio workout than bouldering climbs.

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Advanced Climbing Options

For more advanced climbers, lead climbing, sport climbing, and trad climbing are fun options that you can look forward to after learning to climb. Once you know what type of climbing you are looking to start with, you can get out there and take the first step.

Getting Started with Rock Climbing

The Gear

Whether you decide to top-rope or boulder, you’ll need rock climbing shoes and a chalk bag. The shoes are crucial for proper technique and movement while the chalk keeps your hands dry and grip secure. Rock climbing shoes are meant to be snug; generally one size below the sneakers you wear. Keep in mind that climbing shoes should not be worn anywhere but for climbing. Their extra snug fit emphasizes this point and generally makes them uncomfortable to walk around in. Also, you will stretch out the shoes and ruin the grippy soles if you wear them for non-climbing activities. 

If you are top-rope climbing, you will also need a belaying harness to be properly tied in and secured to the rope. You can take a belay class to learn how to belay a partner, and then you can switch climbs with a friend. To belay, you’ll need a carabiner and a belay device. Many climbing companies sell beginner-friendly packages with harnesses and belay equipment together.

If you are climbing outdoors, you should always wear a helmet to protect your head in the event of a fall or a rock tumbling down from above you. It’s also common to be so focused on your climbing that you forget to look up and climb right into a rock sticking out of the wall. It has certainly happened to me! Other outdoor equipment involves crash pads for bouldering, as mentioned above, a first aid kit, sunscreen, and maybe fingerless gloves if it’s a cold day.

Indoor Rock Climbing

If you want to get started at a gym, most have classes on rock climbing basics. Most also have rental gear available, so you don’t need to buy everything up front before trying rock climbing. You can also head to the gym and start bouldering right away; no help needed. Watch other people do the routes and even ask for “beta” if you need advice on how to get up.

If you’re interested in trying top rope climbing but don’t yet have a belay partner – no need to worry! Many gyms have several auto-belays. These devices clip into your harness and function just like a human belayer, allowing you to test out top-rope climbing as a beginner.

You can easily search for local climbing gyms in your area online, or take a look at this gym directory on Mountain Project to find a place to visit.

Outdoor Rock Climbing

In order to get started with climbing outdoors, you need a guide or, as mentioned above, a qualified friend. The most surefire way to have a fun and safe adventure is with a guided rock climbing tour, which will take you rock climbing in Colorado Springs at a popular local spot. On a guided trip, you’ll learn climbing techniques and safety and have a chance to try different climbs. 

If you want to get into rock climbing via a more DIY style, you’ll need to find a friend who has the necessary gear and know-how to set up climbs. You’ll also want to research the different climbs available in your area to find the best sites for outdoor bouldering or top rope spots with anchor points.

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Rock Climbing Basics

The best way to learn how to rock climb is to get on a route and give it a try. It’s easier to learn rock climbing techniques once you experience the grips and movements. Rock climbing also involves using your forearms, wrists, and hands in ways that most people haven’t developed through other athletics, so it takes time to build these muscles.

My favorite advice for beginner rock climbers is to remember to use their legs and hips. Beginners often overuse their arms and tire quickly. Using all limbs available will help your endurance and give you a good leg workout. My general rule is to make sure I move my legs just as much as I move my arms. There are enough holds on a beginner indoor climbing route to climb a route almost like a ladder.

Similarly, if you find yourself in a tough spot, pivot your feet and move your hips. These small adjustments can get you more reach and flexibility to find that next hold. Keeping your hips closer to the wall also brings your center of gravity closer to minimize the strain on your arms.

Now that you know how to get into rock climbing, I hope you’ll give it a try! Even people who are nervous of heights can overcome this fear by learning belay safety or bouldering. Outdoor rock climbing is a truly unique way to experience nature, and the views from the top of a climb are like nothing else. Enjoy!

Where to See Wildflowers in Colorado Springs

Surrounding the cities of the Colorado foothills are mountain vistas erupting from long stretches of prairie. The sight in itself is astonishing, but it gets even better in the spring. When wildflowers come out to bloom and show their colors after a long winter tucked away, the mountains light up with a vibrance unseen since the year prior. 

Of course, it’s one of the best times of the year to get outside. This list of wildflower hikes in Colorado Springs is a start towards a longer journey of finding every last petal of every last flower and taking in its beauty. And the best part is that you don’t have to look far when seeking out where to see wildflowers in Colorado Springs. With a camera and identification book in hand, it’s time to set out on the trails and see what’s out there.

Garden of the Gods Park

Come springtime, Garden of the Gods has shoots of color popping up in every direction you look. It’s one of the best places to go throughout the entire year, so of course, it makes the list of where to see wildflowers in Colorado Springs. 

This region is perfect for day hiking in Colorado. There are guided walks throughout the day, and you can book hiking tours that will allow you to get a full experience and understanding of flora and fauna along the way. 

The Palmer, Buckskin-Charley, Niobrara, and Bretag Trail loop is an easy four-mile loop throughout the park where you can tour several of the park’s most outstanding features. If you want to get out for some outstanding sights but only have a couple of hours, this is one of the best picks.

Indian paintbrush covers the landscape here along with multiple varieties of wildflowers – such as Colorado blue columbine and bluebells – making it a diverse color scape that can impress anyone who passes through.

Red Rock Canyon Open Space

Located right on the limits of Colorado Springs, Red Rock Canyon Open Space offers another quick getaway to see some of the most spectacular wildflowers the area has to offer. It’s an easy place to get to and has miles of trails to offer. 

Any combination of the various trails can make a great loop to explore and see a variety of different sights like beautiful rock faces to climb and open fields that just recently lost their snow. You may spot some Arrowleaf balsamroot or Rocky Mountain bee plant amongst the Indian paintbrush and other delicate flowers.

Photo by Kevin Bree on Unsplash

North Cheyenne Cañon Park

Here’s another gem that sits so close to the city but makes you feel like you’ve driven hours to find wilderness. The North Cheyenne Cañon Park is a short ten-minute drive from the heart of Colorado Springs and has wildflowers aplenty to offer anyone who comes looking. 

This park is full of granite cliffs and waterfalls, providing a luscious environment for flowers to grow and thrive. The park is 1,000-feet deep in the granite canyon, following the creek the entire way. The water draws an array of birds and wildlife that makes this park unique. 

The Daniels Pass Trail system is a newer part of the park where you can go deep into the woods and find flowers that have stayed hidden for many years without trails to blaze the way. The Mount Muscoco and the Mount Cutler trails are also great options for getting a higher vantage point and seeing the landscape from a new perspective.

Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak may define the area surrounding Colorado Springs. It was what gold miners looked to when they first made their way west, and today it’s one of the most popular 14ers climbed in the state. Pikes Peak is an easy way to get up high and see wildflowers for miles on end as well as right in front of you on the trail. 

The Elk Park trail will take you along open meadows and a beautiful creek that provides an ample environment for wildflowers of all different types. As you move up the mountain, the flora changes with elevation, which can give you the chance to see an even wider variety of flowers on a single trail. 

Here you’ll find Columbia monkshood, Indian paintbrush, orange Agoseris, mountain bluebells, arctic yellow violet, darkthroat shooting star, and the list goes on. Be sure to bring a wildflower identification guide in order to find as many as possible because this is the spot to tick off a lot of boxes in the hunt to discover them all. 

This is likely the only trail where you’ll find a good amount of snow alongside the wildflowers. It can provide a stark contrast that is unlike many other regions in the area and draws visitors from all around.

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Ute Valley Park

Mere minutes north of downtown Colorado Springs is Ute Valley Park. This hidden gem is surrounded by humanity but can still make you feel as if you’ve left the city. All along the trails of this 538-acre park, you can find a blast of color from the many wildflowers in the area. 

Within the park, you’ll likely see some Mariposa lily blooms, prickly pear cacti, and faerie trumpets that are common in the area. While this park might not offer massive mountains to climb, it’s a fantastic representation of what the area is truly like – all within the city limits.

Reasons to Hike with a Guide in the Winter

If you are looking for a fun way to experience the outdoors this winter, Colorado Springs is the perfect place to be. There are so many exciting activities available all year round in our beautiful state, and winter hiking is one particularly wonderful way to experience the beauty of Mother Nature up close and personal.

The Wonders of Winter Hiking 

If you have never gone hiking in the snow before, there are a myriad of reasons, both aesthetic and healthful, to lace up your boots. Hiking in the snow is quite a workout, burning extra calories as your body works to stay warm. It also provides a needed boost of sunlight in those darker months, as the snow reflects those happy rays back up to you. Finally, with mosquitos or other pesky insects hiding from the cold, you can enjoy the hike free from bites and other annoyances. 

Aesthetically speaking, winter is a gorgeous time to enjoy the beauty of Colorado Springs. The is snow hanging from our pine and spruce trees. There’s soft powder crunching under your feet, and the feeling of crisp winter air in your chest. Winter hiking is a wonderful way to get outdoors and enjoy the snow and scenery. 

Photo by Raja Sen on Unsplash

Benefits of Hiking with a Guide in the Winter

Before you hit the trails, one thing you should consider is starting with a guided hike. Whether you are an adventurous type who does not let the snow stop them or a tentative reader desperate to get out of the house, all hikers should start with guided hiking in Colorado Springs. There are a lot of benefits of hiking with a professional guide. Both for your safety and your overall enjoyment of the trip.

Winter Weather Conditions Can Be Unpredictably Dangerous

Especially in a mountainous region like Colorado Springs, weather conditions can change quickly and without warning. Not only can you get stuck in an unanticipated flurry or white-out, but you could be contending with temperature drops. Hiking with a guide is a great way to ensure that you time your trip for the best weather possible and that you are well prepared for the unexpected.

Hiking in the Winter Happens on a Different Schedule

Another aspect of a winter hike that beginners are not used to is the proper pace and timeline to keep. Unlike a trail adventure in warmer conditions, winter hikers should snack while walking or take only short breaks. It is very easy to rest for too long while eating and bring your body temperature down a dangerous amount. With all the calories it takes to heat up again, you could actually end up burning more calories than you took in with your snack! A guide can provide the proper timekeeping to help make sure that you stay warm and safe on the trail. These and other helpful winter hiking safety tips will ensure that you and your family have a safe guided hike.

Proper Clothing Will Keep You Warm and Happy on a Winter Hike

On a related note, dressing for a winter hike can be sort of counterintuitive. This is because you should start a hike slightly cold, as your body will warm up faster. You also need to dress wisely to avoid sweating, as this would make you colder. If you don’t know how to dress on a winter hike, having a guide’s instruction can be the difference between a cold, dangerous trip and a pleasant one.

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A Guided Hike is a Great Family Activity

If you have children, a guided hike is just one winter activity for the whole family to consider. While you may let your kids run around and explore in other seasons, it is especially important to have a guide in the winter. Your guided hike will be tailored to your family member’s ages and skill levels. You can rest assured that your kids are in safe hands while you enjoy some quality bonding in nature.

Guided Hiking Can Be a Great Opportunity for Experiential Education 

Maybe you are just looking to get out of the house and enjoy some quiet time with your own thoughts. Then again, maybe you just have yet to experience the amazing breadth of knowledge that naturalists and other outdoors people have. A winter hike in beautiful Colorado Springs can be a great time to see elk, deer, and other non-hibernating animals. Professional guides can also teach about local ecosystems, identify trees, and the history of Colorado Springs’ awe-inspiring geological formations. If you have yet to go on a guided hike of the area, this winter is the perfect time to get a Wikipedia-level lesson on all the interesting things our natural environment has to offer. 

Winter hiking in Colorado Springs provides so many breathtaking vistas to behold. As if Garden of the Gods is not already stunning enough, don’t miss it with that layer of pure-white snow. North Cheyenne Cañon Park similarly turns into a winter wonderland with unlimited picture-perfect views. Hello, family portrait for next year’s holiday cards!


A winter hike has so many benefits for your mind and body, your relationship with our planet, and your social media feed. When you are ready to head up the trail, be sure to reserve your spot on a guided hike. Having a professional with you will keep everyone safe and leave you with a rejuvenated appreciation for the world around you. There really is no better way to experience wintertime in Colorado Springs!

Best Winter Activities for Families in Colorado Springs

Colorado becomes such a hotspot in the wintertime, and people flock towards the cities as their home base. Colorado Springs is one of the best locations for any family to choose as the spot to come for a winter vacation. It has each and every type of attraction, from underground tours to mountaintops that bring you into the deepest snow. No matter what you choose to do, you won’t come up short of options when figuring out what to do in the winter in Colorado Springs. 

The list we’ve come up with only grazes the surface of winter activities in Colorado Springs. A family could spend the entire winter tucked away in the city and still have places to go and see by the time the thaw comes.

Here’s a list to get your family started. Think of it as a launching point and winter fun as your destination. 

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Best Winter Activities for Families in Colorado Springs

Snowshoeing

One of the most classic winter activities that come along with deep snow is snowshoeing. It’s a traditional mode of travel that goes back thousands of years, but technology has come a long way. 

Today, lightweight snowshoes and designated trails make snowshoeing a fun activity rather than an arduous task to get from one place to another. This can fill an entire day with the family and have even the most energetic kids completely wiped out by the end. 

There are plenty of places to visit in Colorado Springs if you’re looking for prime snowshoeing trails. Mueller State Park has a ton of trails that will take hours to fully cover, Horsethief Park will take you around the Pancake Rocks, and the Barr Trail can take you up Pike’s Peak. These are just a few of the trails found within a short distance from the city. 

Ice Skating

No cheesy Christmas movie is complete without the happy couple skating around the ice rink in the local city park. While you may not be filming a cheesy movie, the same goes for a winter family vacation. 

Ice skating is so much fun for beginners and experts alike. Colorado Springs is home to a variety of indoor and outdoor rinks for the public to try out. Monument Ice Rinks, Sertich Ice Center, and Honnen Ice Center are just a few places to visit. 

Within minutes of getting on the ice, the entire family will be slipping and sliding around, which guarantees to put smiles on everyone’s faces. It can be a humbling experience, but ice skating is a great workout and a ton of fun once you get the hang of it. 

Manitou Springs Hot Springs

It’s an easily agreed-upon fact that hot tubs are one of the best parts of the winter. Finding natural hot springs that allow for a chlorine-free experience increases the value ten-fold. Finding natural hot springs isn’t always easy, and you often have to work for the reward. 

Manitou Springs is located just west of Colorado Springs and is filled with various springs to soak in. This small town makes finding hot springs a simple task and getting in them an even easier one. 

This could be done with the family if the kids are a little wiped out already. It’s the kind of space to take a deep breath and let it out slowly, not a water park to splash around in. Get the family to unwind at the end of the day, or get the body loosened at the beginning.

Royal Gorge Suspension Bridge

The Royal Gorge Suspension Bridge used to be the highest suspension bridge in the world until a bridge in China surpassed it. Today, it is still the tallest bridge in the United States and ranks highly on the list of highest bridges worldwide. Needless to say, if heights are not your thing, maybe stay on land. 

Just a short walk across the bridge is even to take in the dramatic views you can get in the wintertime. It can be astonishing to see the way the snow makes its way down the gorge and to feel so small standing above it. 

The park home to the bridge is also home to ziplines, a sky coaster, bungee jumping, and the newest via ferrata. For those unfamiliar with via ferratas, it’s essentially clipping into metal wires, scaling cliff sides, and looking down at the abyss. Maybe it would be best suited for the family that classifies themselves as highly adventurous. 

Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center

The winter is the best time to visit the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center. The center is dedicated to the rescue of wolves, as well as educating the public. The wolves that call this center home are the most active in the winter, which is why we highly recommend putting it on your winter bucket list. 

The Wolf and Wildlife Center is also home to four different foxes. This is an excellent opportunity to throw a bit of education into the mix of other fun on vacation. 

Cave of the Winds Mountain Park

The final destination on our list may be more unexpected in the winter. Why? Because it is completely without snow. That’s what may make it one of the best winter activities in Colorado Springs.

Cave of the Winds Mountain Park is located a short drive west of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region. This complex of intricate caves isn’t just a great relief from the snowy wonderland above ground. It’s full of fascinating geology. The tour takes you through 15 different rooms and on over a half-mile of trails. 

Cave of the Winds also has Christmas Underground, a Christmas celebration full of songs and stories to bring the holiday cheer below ground. It is the perfect thing to do with your family to get that brief escape from the snow without being tucked away in a hotel room. 

Best Time of Year to Visit Colorado Springs

As tourism across Colorado continues to rise, Colorado Springs has become a popular destination during all seasons of the year. However, like any tourist destination, there are peak seasons, shoulder seasons, and off-seasons. 

Are you trying to avoid crowds?

Do you like to whitewater raft?

Are you thinking more of a foodie city tour?

The best time to visit often revolves around the type of activities you like to do, when you have time, and your personal preferences. To match your travel needs, find out when the peak tourist season is as well as our favorite time of the year.

What is the peak tourist season in Colorado Springs?

Like many areas of the United States, summer tends to be the peak tourist season. The reason summer is peak tourist season is because that’s when children are off of school and families can vacation together. There also happens to be some pretty stellar weather for outdoor activities.

Although summer is a beautiful time of the year, summer in Colorado Springs is hot and dry. The average temperatures range from 70-80 degrees Fahrenheit, which is warm but not too hot to stop outdoor activities. In this region of Colorado, summer is also a popular time for festivals and special events, drawing in even more visitors and providing more options for activities.

When visiting at the peak of the summer tourist season, remember that we have afternoon thunderstorms in the mountains. So, hiking in the mountains can be cut short without proper planning. If you’re new to hiking in Colorado, the safest option is to book a hiking tour with experienced guides and locals that can keep tabs on essential things like weather for you. 

If you’re not a fan of crowds, it is a safe bet to steer clear of visiting during the summer months. Overcrowding at popular destinations like Pikes Peak or Garden of the Gods is expected in the summertime, so if you are seeking solitude, try a different time of the year. 

Best time of year to visit Colorado Springs

In our opinion, the best times of the year to visit Colorado Springs are March to May and September to October. The Spring and the Fall still see a decent number of visitors but won’t be as crowded as Summer. 

The temperatures tend to be colder in both shoulder seasons, but they are still quite comfortable for outdoor activities. Visiting Colorado Springs in the shoulder seasons also means fewer crowds and potentially lower prices on lodging and tours. 

Spring in Colorado Springs

Visiting in the Spring is a great option, especially if you are looking for outdoor activities to do. The temperatures range from 45-65 degrees Fahrenheit most days, which is excellent for those that want cool hiking temperatures. 

Another popular attraction during the Spring is the whitewater. With the mountain snow melting, the water rises and quickens in rivers and streams around the area. The higher water levels mean an increase in the opportunity for kayaking and rafting. 

Fall in Colorado Springs

Fall in Colorado Springs has begun to grow in popularity with tourists as many visitors enjoy the fall colors in the mountains. The Fall colors bring in a lot of day-trippers and weekenders, but as the temperatures begin to drop, so do the number of visitors. 

The average temperature in the Fall ranges from 45-70 degrees Fahrenheit. This is decent weather for hiking well through the first weeks of October. One of the best ways to see the Fall colors is to join one of our zip line tours. You’ll get a unique view of the foliage and get the best overlook in the area. 

If a zip line isn’t your scene, the views are still breathtaking when taking a trip up Pikes Peak by car, hiking, or choosing a Cog tour

Photo by Matt Noble on Unsplash

The offseason

While we enjoy the Spring and the Fall for outdoor activities, do not discount Winter vacations in Colorado Springs! Winter in this part of Colorado is not too cold. The average temperatures sit around 40 degrees Fahrenheit. When it does snow, the snow tends to melt quickly as well. 

The only catch with visiting in the winter is that some of the hotels and other tourist attractions are closed. So, if you plan to visit in the winter, check-in in advance and book ahead of time to make sure that you can find a hotel during your stay. Plus, the hotels that remain open tend to have much better prices than any other time of the year. 

With more affordable prices in the winter, it is one of the best times to stay at the Broadmoor Hotel. If you love the holidays, you’ll enjoy the city, and the Broadmoor decorated for the season’s festivities. A winter vacation in Colorado Springs is ideal for those that like quiet winter hikes, snowshoeing, and cozy activities like cooking classes, fine arts, and food tours. 

Although it doesn’t tend to be a primary winter sports destination, it is still close enough to take a trip up the pass to ski or snowboard in Vail, Keystone, or Breckenridge. 

Best Lodging in Colorado Springs for Hikers

There are many great reasons to stay in Colorado Springs, but the main draw for tourists is outdoor recreation. If you’re coming into town to hike, bike, climb, or do any of the other many exciting outdoor activities in our area, you also need a place to stay. 

Websites and services like Airbnb or even Glamping Hub have made it easier to customize your experience to fit your needs. There are pros and cons to all types of lodging in Colorado Springs. So, first, identifying your personal travel needs and budget can help you narrow down the options. 

Since Colorado Springs has grown to be such a popular travel destination, you have a variety of options to choose from, including, hotels, lodges, vacation rentals, campgrounds, van rentals, cabins, and resorts. 

To help you get the best of all of the options, we’ve put together a list of our top choice for hotels, lodges, and resorts. That way, you’ll have only the top recommendations in each category to contend with, helping you get one step closer to the best experience Colorado Springs has to offer. 

Our Favorite Hotel for Hikers: Best Western Plus Peak Vista Inn & Suites

Booking a lodge or staying at a resort isn’t for everyone. That’s why we’ve included one of Trip Advisor’s Traveler recommendations as our top hotel choice for hikers. 

The Best Western is in the prime location for families and other travelers to check out local attractions like Garden of the Gods and Manitou Springs. You’re also in a prime location to enjoy many of the local restaurants and shops. You’ll have easy access to main roads, hiking, tours, and more.

This hotel is pet-friendly and has lots of green space for walking your pet around when you’re at the hotel. So, consider this an optimal stop-over point for those of you who always travel with your dog. 

Like most standard hotels, you can enjoy a complimentary breakfast, wi-fi, guest laundry, a pool, and a fitness center. We will say, if you’re looking for a clean and affordable place that has friendly staff and a good location, this hotel is a top contender. You’ll also be relatively close to the Broadmoor Outfitters meeting location if you stay here. 

Do not expect additional perks or services when staying in a hotel, though. Consider our recommendations below if you’re looking for a more “all-inclusive” stay in Colorado Springs. 

Top Rated Lodge in Colorado Springs: The Lodge at Flying Horse

As a 2020 TripAdvisor Traveler’s choice lodge, we felt the need to include the Lodge at Flying Horse on our list. Adventure couples especially enjoy this facility with the two private 18-hole golf courses, access to swimming pools, an athletic club and spa, and attractions within driving distance. 

As far as a lodge experience goes, this one is excellent. We will say that the drive is about 25 minutes to Garden of the Gods and Pikes Peak Railway from here. So, you’ll want to make sure you have a vehicle or book a tour.

The lodge itself is picturesque, and many guests enjoy rooms with a patio and mountain views. There is on-site dining, so after a day hiking or biking on nearby trails, you can head back to the lodge to freshen up, enjoy dinner, and relax. 

The Broadmoor Resort

The Best Resort for Outdoor Families: The Broadmoor

Although our first two options offer amazing experiences, if you are looking for a gorgeous resort, wilderness experience, and you want to discover adventure, look no further than The Broadmoor. As far as places to stay in Colorado Springs, The Broadmoor offers longstanding impeccable accommodations, services, and distinct amenities. 

You’ll rediscover the spirit of adventure with the unique opportunities and proximity to mountains, streams, and canyons. What’s even better is that The Broadmoor is home to countless outdoor adventure tours. 

Experience Colorado Springs like never before with once-in-a-lifetime zipline tours, guided hikes, and family-friendly adventures. When you get back to the resort, relax at the spa and enjoy the personalized luxury only The Broadmoor can provide. 

If you book any adventures with Broadmoor Outfitters, our trips leave from basecamp as a Broadmoor guest, making the adventure even more convenient. Non-hotel guests meet at the activity booth located across from Golden Bee restaurant on 6 Lake Ave. 

How to Layer for Fall Hiking in Colorado

If you are a big hiker or nature enthusiast, you know that fall is arguably the best season for hiking. The energizing nip of crisp air on your face, the colorful foliage as nature buckles down for winter – personally, it’s my favorite time of year. If you are hoping to enjoy fall hiking here in Colorado, you certainly need to know how to layer for hiking. These tips on proper layering techniques will help ensure you are prepared for the weather you might encounter on a fall hike in the beautiful Rocky Mountains.

The Principles of Layering for Colorado’s Fall Weather

The first thing to know is that the term ‘layering’ doesn’t mean just wearing more and more clothes. In order to brave the elements and stay comfortable and safe, you need to wear the proper clothes in the proper order. First, the base layer serves to keep you dry when you sweat. Next, the middle layer is insulating to help retain body heat in Colorado’s colder weather. Finally, the outer layer protects against the harsher conditions you may experience on a fall hike.

We’ll start at the base layer and work our way out, so you understand what fabrics are best for each layer. We’ll also learn how to layer for the specifics of fall weather in Colorado and the hikes you are planning. As you likely know, fall in Colorado can range from warm to very cold. The weather can change quickly, and conditions can worsen with no warning. Especially if you are hiking to a higher elevation, say summiting one of the state’s many fourteeners, you will find temperatures and precipitation requiring a much different outfit than what you had on in the parking lot. It’s important to dress and pack well, as you will learn.

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

The Wicking Base Layer 

You can think of the base layer as the clothing that touches your skin. This is more than just a t-shirt and shorts or a long-sleeved shirt and long underwear. Remember that the base layer also includes underwear (boxers, briefs, bras, and more) and socks.

The main goal of the base layer is to wick away moisture and keep your skin dry. As you know, sweat cools you down, stealing your body heat much faster than a cold breeze. In the hot summer, you may not mind a cotton shirt absorbing and holding your sweat. In the fall and winter, though, cotton is at the top of the “Absolutely Not” list. Seriously, it’s one of the most important hiking safety tips of all time.

Photo by Stephen Leonardi on Unsplash

The Best Base Layer Materials

The best synthetic fabrics for base layers are polyester and nylon. You likely have these in your closet as your running or exercise clothes. You can go by personal preference, as long as it is ‘moisture-wicking,’ ‘dry-fit,’ or the like. Again, make sure your bras and boxers meet these criteria, too. A great natural fabric, especially for socks, is wool, as it wicks moisture and provides great heat retention. Wool is good for clothing, too, if you are in colder temperatures or hiking Colorado’s many mountains. It will keep you warm without being too heavy, but it also is more expensive than synthetic fabrics.

There are a few different options in terms of the weights of base layers, and you can decide based on the time of year and anticipated weather. No matter what you choose, your base layer should always be moisture-wicking. This layer should also fit snugly against your skin. You don’t want gaps between your skin and the material as it won’t be able to wick sweat away as effectively. A tight but comfortable base layer will keep your skin dry, which in turn will keep you warm and prevent skin irritation, like chafing and blisters.

Base Layering Tips for Colorado’s Fall Weather

Base layers are organized by weight; lightweight or ultra-lightweight for hotter weather and midweight or heavyweight for the colder months. This might mean shorts and a t-shirt in early fall when Colorado temperatures are in the 50s or 60s, and long johns and long-sleeved shirts in late fall when it’ll be in the 30s and 40s on average. Because the weather can change quickly here, especially in the mountains, I prefer to keep my base layer light and carry a heavier middle layer in my day pack.

Remember, the goal of this layer is moisture-wicking, where warmth is the job of the middle layer. That’s why lighter base layers make sense in Colorado’s fall conditions. You can always add more clothes later if the temperature drops up the mountain. The one exception to this is socks. My feet always run cold, so I highly recommend a thick wool sock for fall hikes, ones that cover your ankles! As long as your hiking boots are breathable, your feet will be happily dry and warm.

The Insulating Middle Layer

Next up, it is the job of the middle layer to retain body heat and keep you warm in colder temperatures. Where base layers tend to be stretchy and thin, you’ll recognize your middle layer pieces by their soft and puffy qualities. When shopping, you may see middle layer options listed as ‘soft shells.’ Depending on the weather, you can choose a lighter or heavier option, so it’s a good idea to have multiple middle layer pieces if you are planning on frequent fall hikes in Colorado. 

Photo by lucas Favre on Unsplash

Middle Layer Options for Fall in Colorado

For lighter wear, you might go with a microfleece pullover or hoodie. Fleece is nice because it dries quickly and stays warm. It is also breathable so that you won’t overheat. This is a great option for the early fall in Colorado. However, if it’s windy, you will definitely need an outer shell, or you’ll find the breathability a weakness.

For the colder days, a down jacket is the best middle layer. I am partial to synthetic down, both for the animals and the water resistance. Down insulated jackets don’t hold up well when wet, but they compress better than synthetic down if you need to save space in your pack. If a softshell is all you plan on wearing, I’d recommend one with a hood, so your neck stays warm. In this case, though, you will definitely need to pack a waterproof outer shell, as the fall in Colorado sees rain or snow regularly.

The Defending Outer Layer

Once you’ve got the dry and warm inner layers set, the last part of knowing how to layer for hiking is protecting against the elements. Fall in Colorado can be all over the map in terms of weather conditions, and this outer shell is key for making sure the wind, rain, and snow don’t penetrate and leave you cold and miserable.

Photo by Daniel Lincoln on Unsplash

The Best Outer Layers for Colorado’s Fall Season

For both jackets and pants, you will want waterproof outerwear. Trust me when I say that “water-resistant” is not good enough! If you get caught in a downpour, a water-resistant layer is going to soak and leave you shivering. Also, be sure it has a hood. Rain dripping down your neck and back is truly an uncomfortable and dangerous way to spend a hike.

In addition to water- and wind-proof material, your outer layer should also be breathable. These pieces are more expensive, but if you plan on exploring Colorado’s fall hikes, this feature is a must. Breathable jackets, ones with zippers in the armpits and such, are key for longer hikes because they keep you dry while you work hard. If the inner layers are wicking away moisture, but your outer layer isn’t breathable, the moisture will condense against it and soak your middle layer. You need breathability to allow fresh air to move through and clear out the humidity. 

One final feature of a good outer layer is durability. Since this layer has to brave the elements, you want something that will stand up to a bit of a beating, especially for pants that you’ll sit on, trek through the brush, and more. If your outer layer gets torn, you’ll have leaks when it rains. And with the expensive nature of these clothes, you want to make sure to buy something that is a good investment.

Packing for a Fall Hike in the Rockies

Now that you know the options for layering clothes, let’s talk about how to pack for day hiking in Colorado. Seasoned hikers are always carrying day packs, and it’s not just for the granola bars. 

When you start at the trailhead, you might be in your base layer and outer shell. Mid-fall in Colorado is comfortable, and you might reason that it’ll only be a few hours. But as you hike up the mountain, the weather changes. It will get colder and windier the higher you go, with less protection from surrounding trees. You may even get an unexpected shower or snow flurry. 

Before you leave, always check the weather to know what to expect. Then, pack that insulating middle layer anyway. A light fleece or down jacket won’t take up much room or add much weight, and you will be glad you have it when you need it. Wearing appropriate clothing and knowing how to layer for hiking will keep you comfortable and protected during your hike so you can enjoy mother nature, no matter what weather she brings.

What is Geocaching and Where Can I Do It?

Treasure maps and long-form expeditions to find a secret stash of goods are no longer just for youth ages 3 to 10. Geocaching can be seen as a “grown-up” version of a treasure hunt, and it will take you places you may have never been before.

Not only is it a great form of exercise and exploration, but it also reignites the kid inside of you. Today that may be precisely what we all need.

What is Geocaching?

Yes, a treasure map and exploration sounds great, but that doesn’t tell us exactly what geocaching is. It doesn’t involve digging in random spots to find a buried chest or a compass that points to your one true desire, but rather it gives you a goal to seek out, without compromising the natural integrity of the world around it. Done correctly, it can be enjoyed by hundreds for years on end without making much of an impact at all.

Geocaching is a simple concept made possible and accessible by the technology we all carry around in our pockets. With the Geocaching app, you can find hidden caches just about anywhere around the world, as there are now over 3 million recorded caches worldwide. The sport has become much more popular as a way to get outside and add a bit of flair to your regular daily walk. 

To start, download the Geocaching app, or find a local website that directs you to sites near you. Next, you need to prepare yourself for a long hike that could end up being a long day in the woods. Some geocaches are hidden in downtown, urban areas, while many of them live in more natural environments. You should pack for the unexpected, as geocaching can quickly turn into a true adventure. 

Once you’re out on the trail, you need to channel your powers of observation to spot the camouflaged spot where the geocache lives. Once you find the cache, sign the logbook and add your touch to the cache. Geocaches are most often based on the principle of “take something out, leave something of your own.” 

Getting Started Geocaching

To start, we recommend simply using your smartphone and the Geocaching app. You can buy a GPS unit that will often have geocaching features, but it isn’t fully necessary. Family-friendly geocaching tours are a great way to get started and stoke the entire family for future geocaching adventures. Geocaching for kids builds a sense of adventure and can help to develop helpful skills like navigation. 

Once you have your guidance tech figured out, you can decide on a cache to hunt down from the comfort of your couch. One of the best parts of Geocaching is that you can plan trips around the entire world from a single spot. There are limitless options of where to start as more and more caches are being put out there every day. 

Now that you have a target in mind, you can put in some more prep work. This will not only include packing your backpack for a day hike, but it will also be planning your route to get to the cache. The app will show you where the cache is, but it doesn’t offer you the best route. This means you’ll need to pay attention to the landscape and study how to get to this spot. 

Many caches will not be right off a trail. You’ll need to head off into the forest to find caches that aren’t as commonly found. Remember to take the proper precautions and stay within your experience level. 

Once you’ve found the cache, there are a couple of pieces of etiquette that you need to keep in mind:

  • Grab the cache and examine its contents away from where you found it. Spending too much time where you found it can leave traces that make it too easy for others to discover it, thus removing a lot of the fun. 
  • Sign the logbook and leave a quick note if you want!
  • Take an object (if you want to) only if you are prepared to leave something of equal or greater value. This allows the cache to continue giving to future explorers. 
  • Seal the cache tightly and place it back exactly where you found it so it can wait for the next adventurer to stumble onto it. 
Geocaching with Broadmoor Outfitters in Colorado Springs
A young woman finding a geocache in Colorado Springs

Where can I Geocache in Colorado?

190 countries across the world have geocaches, and over 3 million caches spread out amongst them. Over 22,000 of these caches are located in the state of Colorado. With that many caches out there for you, it makes geocaching a popular sport that can be enjoyed for years without repetition. 

Colorado Parks and Wildlife has an extensive list of where you can find caches in the state parks. They encourage visitors to come and explore the area to find the caches and ask that explorers use Leave No Trace methods to leave everything in pristine condition. 

Parks and Wildlife points out that there are potentially hundreds of more caches that have not been documented with them. Colorado Springs alone has thousands of caches on record. These hunts take you up and down the trails and mountains surrounding the beautiful city and have some of the oldest caches in the state. 

So to answer the question more directly, you can Geocache just about anywhere in Colorado. This is a state that is based on exploration and outdoor adventure. When you start Geocaching and eventually catch the bug, you can expand the sport and bring it to even more distant and remote places throughout the state. The explorations and possibilities are endless. 

Paintballing Safety Tips

Paintball is a fun and exciting team sport. It requires strategy and cooperation, and it certainly gets players physically active. However, it can also be dangerous, and that’s why it’s important to learn and follow basic safety rules. In this guide, we’ll go over the key paintball safety tips you need to know before getting on the field. Once you’ve read through this list, you’ll be ready to enjoy the best paintball Colorado Springs has to offer.

1: Always Wear Eye Protection

Safety goggles are an absolute must when paintballing. Getting hit with a paintball on your skin can be a little painful, but it won’t cause a severe injury. Especially if you are wearing padding, you’ll just end up with a little bump or red area. A paintball to the eye, however, can cause very serious injury. This is why safety goggles are the number one paintball safety tip. A full-face shield, which includes protection for your eyes and breathing holes for your nose and mouth, is even better. But either way, the primary paintball safety rule is to keep them on at all times.

If you need to adjust your eye protection, you will have to exit the field of play or go to a designated “safe zone” if there is one. Do not take your goggles off anywhere else, even if you think you are hidden. 

If you have your own goggles, be aware that the lenses need to be replaced according to the manufacturer’s guidelines, and you should never play with cracked or old lenses. Also, be sure only to use dedicated goggles cleaner, as other products could be corrosive to the lenses and wear them down.

Image by Evan Cornman from Pixabay

2: Look Where You Shoot & Do Not Hit Anyone Without Eye Protection

It is very important to make sure that you are not “firing blind.” Beginner paintballers tend to close their eyes when shooting. This is totally natural! However, you will be allowed to practice firing at a marker before the competition starts so you can get used to the feeling. 

You always need to look where your marker is aiming before you shoot. First, make sure that you are within the field of play. Then be sure that the person you are aiming at, and everyone else around, is wearing proper protective equipment. Next, check that the person you are aiming at does not have their hands up. (As you will read below, this means that they are already out and exiting the playing field.) Finally, make sure you are aiming at the person’s torso, not their face.

If anyone does not have goggles on, your marker should be pointed down at the ground! Do not shoot even if the person without eye protection is on the side and not where you are aiming. Paintball markers are not the most precise shots, and someone could easily run in front of your target at the last second. This is why if you see someone without goggles on, you need to lower your paintball marker until they exit the field of play.

3. Give a Player the Opportunity to Surrender & Be a Good Sport

One common paintball safety practice is the idea of surrendering. If a player is close to you, within twenty feet when outdoors, you should give them the chance to surrender before shooting them. Getting hit by a paintball at such close range can be quite painful, so it is sportsmanlike to announce yourself and not actually shoot the person. You can yell “Surrender” or “You’re out” to tell the person that you got them, even though you aren’t firing your marker.

On this same note, if someone has snuck up on you and lets you surrender, do it. It would be poor sportsmanship to run away and say you are still in the game because you didn’t get hit. Trust us when we say that you do not want to get hit at such close range. When someone lets you surrender, put your hands up and exit the field.

4. Do Not Shoot Anything but Your Target

If you need to practice shooting, you will have access to a practice range and targets. Otherwise, you should only shoot at other players or targets in the field of play. Do not shoot at any wildlife, passing cars, or structures outside of the playing area. 

For one thing, it may be illegal, but it is also dangerous. You could hurt someone, and the paint in paintballs can leave behind a stain. Shooting when you are not supposed to is an easy way to end your day early by getting kicked out. Be respectful of your surroundings and only shoot at designated targets.

Photo by Pengyi zhang on Unsplash

5. Always Use a Barrel Sock and the Safety

There are two features of a marker that both make for essential paintball safety tips. First, a barrel sock is exactly what it sounds like: a sock that goes over the head of your marker’s barrel. This blocks paintballs from exiting the barrel if the marker accidentally discharges. Leave the barrel sock on until play is about to begin, and put it back on the barrel immediately once you exit the field.

The second is the safety, which you toggle on or off to be able to shoot. Anytime you are not on an active playing field, your safety should be in the ‘on’ position. This will make it impossible to pull the trigger, thus preventing you from accidentally discharging the marker.

6. Exit with Your Hands Up

When you are ready to exit the playing field (because you were hit, surrendered, or just need a break), you must announce yourself. To make it clear to other players that you are leaving, you should yell “out” and raise your hands and your paintball marker above your head. 

Be sure to walk off the field of play quickly and directly. If you are looking around at other players or zigzagging through obstacles, other players might mistakenly shoot you. Keep your hands up the whole time and keep your goggles on. 

Once you are out of the playing zone, you should first turn the marker’s safety on and put the barrel sock back on. Once your marker is protected, then you can take your goggles off, relax, and watch the rest of the game.

Photo by Vince Fleming on Unsplash

7. Take Cover to Rest and Reload

The best way to avoid getting hit is to ensure you don’t spend too much time in the open. Here are a couple key paintball tips for finding good positions on the field. First, if you can see in all directions, it means you are visible in all directions. And second, just because you can’t see someone doesn’t mean they can’t see you. It just means they are better hidden than you are. 

You want to keep yourself hidden, but not overly so. After all, if you stay in one spot all day, you’ll never hit anyone. Moving among protected areas is actually safer, too, as your opponents are doing the same to find you. You should run between trees or shelters, also called bunkers, and rest only when you are in a protected spot.

When you need to reload, find a safe spot, get low, and keep your back to a wall. You may be tempted to fire a shot to make sure your marker works, but be warned that the sound will give away your position!

8. Do Not Attempt to Fix a Paintball Marker Yourself

If your marker is jammed or having an issue, do not try to make any modifications on your own. You should bring it to staff or experts to fix it for you. Attempting any maintenance can be very dangerous for you and other players.

For one thing, markers may still have a charge after the CO2 canister has been removed. The proper way to take off a CO2 canister is to fire the marker (with no paintballs in it) as you remove the tank in order to release built-up air as you go. However, if you are renting a marker for the day, this is not even something you will have to worry about. You should leave the canister alone completely and tell staff if something is wrong.

Similarly, a paintball marker that you rent will come ready with proper settings. For outdoor challenges, markers should be set to around 300 feet per second (fps). Some ranges might require a slightly lower velocity, like 285 fps. Whatever it is, do not make any modifications to the marker.

Image by Christoph Schütz from Pixabay

9. Stretch & Drink Lots of Water

Paintballing requires a lot of physical activity. With all that running around, it’s important to stretch beforehand like you would for any other sport. Make sure you stay hydrated and listen to your body if you get too hot or tired. A paintball competition could last for a couple of hours, depending on the type of play and the number of players. Take a break when you need it so you can head back on the field strong and ready.

10: Have Fun!

Paintballing is an awesome outdoor activity to enjoy with a group of friends. With just a little preparation and practice, you can start an invigorating new sport that lasts for hours at a time. These tips will help ensure your paintball challenge is fun, safe, and injury-free. Now get out there and enjoy the game!

Group Destinations and Activities in Colorado Springs

There is an undeniable power in the shared experience. Whether you are on a scout troop guided trip, corporate retreat, or large family reunion, there are few places better catered to team building and creating lifelong memories than Colorado.

From casual escapes into nature to adrenaline-pumping activities that will push you and your crew to the edges of their comfort zone, the group activities in Colorado Springs can’t be beaten. When planning your next corporate outdoor activity or group retreat, bump the Centennial State to the top of your list.

Not yet convinced? Check out these five most popular group activities offered right here at Broadmoor Outfitters. 

1. Zip Lining

Number of Participants: 8 per tour, multiple tours available 

Duration: Woods Course – 3 hours, Fins Course – up to 4 hours 

Ages: All ages for the Woods Course, 10 – 80 for the Fins Course

Level: Woods Course – Easy, Fins Course – Intermediate

In the past couple of decades, zip lining has experienced a meteoric rise in popularity across the globe. It is a fun thing to do when traveling and an excellent team-building activity for large corporate getaways and scout troop guided trips alike. Zip lining is incredibly fun, very exhilarating, offers sweeping views of the surrounding landscape, and is accessible for just about anyone.  

The Woods Course is our more beginner-friendly option and is accessible for thrill-seekers of all ages. Lasting about three hours, this group activity will have you traveling high above the forest and canyon floor on five individual lines reaching a maximum height of 150 feet. Those brave enough will enjoy unrivaled views of waterfalls, launch off of spectacular granite rock features, and travel smoothly through the trees. 

For even more airborne adventure, give the Fins Course a try. Similar to the Woods Course, this adventure puts participants on five separate zip lines. These lines, however, are much higher (maxing out at 500 feet above the ground!) and longer (the longest measuring in at 1,800 feet), and the course also includes two rope bridges and a rappel.

For a full day, combine the two courses!

Geocaching with Broadmoor Outfitters in Colorado Springs

2. The Broadmoor Hunt

Number of Participants: 5 – 100

Duration: 2 hours

Ages: All ages

Level: Easy

For the ultimate activity for groups of all sizes, ages, and abilities, schedule a day to complete the Broadmoor Hunt. This Amazing Race style scavenger hunt traverses all over the Broadmoor property and includes over 35 unique challenges. From riddles and clues to activities and photo captures, you can break your large group into smaller teams for some friendly competition and team building.

The hunt works off of your smartphone, and each group can strategize their path to victory. From corporate retreats to family reunions, The Broadmoor Hunt is a fun and interactive way to explore and learn all about the historic Broadmoor and the surrounding area. There’s nothing like a bit of competition to bring a large team together! 

Colorado Springs Falconry at The Broadmoor
The Broadmoor, Colorado Springs

3. Falconry

Number of Participants: 14 per group

Duration: 1.5 hours

Ages: 5 and older

Level: Easy

Falconry is undoubtedly one of the most unique group activities in Colorado Springs – allowing you and your group to learn about hunting with birds of prey. The lesson will start with a fair bit of education, where your group will learn all about this 4,000-year-old pastime, sport, and way of life, as the experts give a flying demonstration and you get to meet many of our captive-bred trained birds of prey. The day closes with a bang, as everyone in your group will have an opportunity to hold a trained hawk after learning proper technique.  

Those that have completed the beginner lesson can advance to an even more exhilarating experience: the opportunity to walk scenic trails with a guide as a trained Harris Hawk flies through the trees, returning to your glove on your command. Whether your group stops at the beginner lesson or takes your falconry education to the next level, it is sure to be an experience no one will soon forget. 

4. The Wild West Experience

Number of Participants: 12 per group

Duration: 2.5 to 3 hours

Ages: 5 and older

Level: Easy

If you have come to the mountains searching for group activities in Colorado Springs, perhaps none are more fitting than the Wild West Experience. Gain an appreciation for the skills that allowed people to survive and thrive in mountain landscapes for thousands of years. The three-part Wild West Experience is undeniably the best bang for your buck as you learn how to use a bow, air rifle, and throwing ax. 

Guides will walk your group through traditional archery skills and accompany you to a range where you will then put your skills to the test. From there, your guides will instruct your group on rifle shooting. Then, test your meddle with .22 caliber air rifles on a range with many different moving and stationary targets. Close your western skills experience with an ax-throwing session. Following more direction from an expert instructor, your group will have the opportunity to toss tomahawks into wooden targets. 

The Wild West Experience provides the perfect avenue for skills and team building, cooperation, coaching and support, and friendly competition – depending on the angle you would like to take. No matter how you slice it, though, this is one of the best group activities in Colorado Springs. 

5. Rock Climbing

Number of Participants: 12

Duration: Half day to full day 

Ages: 12 and up

Level: Easy to challenging

There is no better way to add some adventure to a large group getaway than with a day of guided rock climbing. No matter your group’s skill, fitness, or comfort level, the professional rock guides promise to deliver an unforgettable day. Push your physical and mental limits, and coach each other through enjoyable challenges in the mountains. You will learn climbing knots and belay techniques from expert guides and practice your skills on real outdoor cliff faces. 

With many picturesque climbing areas right out our front door, we have the opportunity to cater the entire day to your specific needs. Your group will coach each other up the wall and perfect your technical skills from one challenge to the next!


Group travel is an incredible way to create a shared experience and foster lasting memories with people you care about. Scheduling free time and exploring on your own is a necessity when planning these types of trips, but guided group activities and tours in Colorado Springs can add a meaningful exclamation point to an already unforgettable trip. Regardless of the group activities you choose, the Rocky Mountains will always find a way to bring people closer together.